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Canadian Aboriginal Minerals Association hosting conference

The Canadian Aboriginal Minerals Association (CAMA) will host its 23rd annual conference Nov. 22-24 in Vancouver, B.C. under the theme, Leading Resource Management, Protecting Our Environment.
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Stan Wesley will chair the Canadian Aboriginal Minerals Association conference Nov. 22-24.

The Canadian Aboriginal Minerals Association (CAMA) will host its 23rd annual conference Nov. 22-24 in Vancouver, B.C. under the theme, Leading Resource Management, Protecting Our Environment.

Highlights of this year’s conference include an expert armchair panel, which will look at the emerging trends in the legal landscape in Canada and what can be expected in relation to Aboriginal peoples and resource development. It will be moderated by author and CBC broadcaster Wab Kinew.

Métis National Council president Clément Chartier will give a State of the Community address, while Pierre Gratton, president of the Mining Association of Canada, will give a State of the Industry address.

Attendees will also participate in concurrent workshop circles and learn about the co-operation and benefits agreement developed between gold miner Pretivm and the Nisga’a Nation.

Pretivm is developing the Brucejack Mine 65 kilometres north of Stewart in northwestern British Columbia. It has probable and proven gold reserves of 6.9 million ounces of gold (13.6 million tonnes grading 15.7 grams per tonne gold).

A gala dinner will feature motivational speaker and conference chair Stan Wesley.

CAMA is an Aboriginal, non-profit organization that advocates for the advancement of Aboriginal community economic development, mineral resource management and environmental protection.

It believes in advancing Aboriginal communities to economic self-sufficiency by establishing relationships in the mining industry, negotiating practical benefits agreements, addressing mineral exploration and development issues, and mitigating negative impacts as partners with mining companies.



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